Paper clips project holocaust history

Six Million Paper Clips: The Making of a Children's Holocaust MemorialNavigation menu

The “Paper Clips Project” extended over several years and in the school dedicated a Children’s Holocaust Memorial, which includes an authentic German railcar filled with a portion of the more than 30 million paper clips they eventually collected. A moving documentary, entitled Paper Clips and originally released theatrically in The Paper Clip Project: A Holocaust Memorial. Thus, when WWII and the Nazis were at their peak, Jews began sporting the clip in quiet solidarity. The Whitwell students started collecting paper clips from their homes, from their friends and from far-away family; from anyone and everyone who wanted to become a part of their ambitious memorial project. Sep 01,  · Paper Clips. One letter came from a Holocaust survivor with 14 clips, one for each family member who had been exterminated. A suitcase arrived from Germany containing messages addressed to Anne Frank by students there, asking for her forgiveness. Everything that came in the mail, overwhelming the local post office. embarked on a study of the Holocaust. These paper clips, a Norwegian symbol of resistance to the Nazi occupation, were collected from all over the world and placed in this car as a reminder of the tragic loss of 11,, souls that occurred during the Holocaust. As you reflect on the horror of this tragedy. The Paper Clips Project burgeoned, garnering international attention. In , Whitwell Middle School dedicated a Children's Holocaust Memorial, featuring an authentic German boxcar filled with a portion of the more than thirty million paper clips collected. The documentary film, "Paper Clips," released in , tells the inspirational story.

The enormity of the Holocaust resonated with the students, who came to understand the frightening potential of humans on a new level of profundity. How could the Nazis rob so many of their human rights? How could so many countries stand idle during the genocide of six million Jewish victims? Something, the students thought, had to be done to further memorialize the unjust deaths of those lost in WWII. The result? The most difficult task for the students was finding an object that they could collect easily, in mass, which was also relevant to the history of the Holocaust. But after some research, a student discovered that a Norwegian Jew named Joseph Vaaler had invented the object in L'Chayim: Paper Clips Project Founder, Linda Hooper The Paper Clips Projectflips middle school students from the small southeastern Tennessee town of Whitwellcreated a monument for the Holocaust victims of Nazi Germany. It started in as a simple 8th-grade project to study other cultures, and then evolved into one gaining worldwide attention. An award-winning documentary film about the project, Paper Clipspaper clips project holocaust history released in by Miramax Films. InLinda M. Hooper, principal of Whitwell Middle School in Whitwell, Yistory, asked Assistant Principal David Smith to find a voluntary after-school project to teach the children about tolerance.

The Paper Clips Project, by middle school students from the small southeastern Tennessee Most letters contain a story or a dedication of the attached paper clips to a certain person. a ride from points across North America to Whitwell, TN to commemorate the Paperclip Project and in honor of the Holocaust's victims. The “Paper Clips Project” extended over several years and in the school dedicated a Children's Holocaust Memorial, which includes an authentic German . The paper clip collection has become a part of the "Children's Holocaust Memorial" created by the students, staff, and community of Whitwell Middle School. As a part of their study of the Holocaust, the children of the Whitwell, TN Middle School Tom Bosley in the documentary PAPERCLIPS Whitwell Middle School's principal, Linda Hopper, tells us about the town's history and racial make-up. But the story of what happened in that small rural town has inspired millions around The “Paper Clips Project” extended over several years and, in , the.

paper clips project holocaust history Details if other :. More filters. As the follow me by tryhardninja learned about the atrocities that went on, they began to wonder what six paper clips project holocaust history looked like; and thus the project was born. The Children's Holocaust Memorial brought the world to the small town's doorstep and has allowed people there to gather around a common cause; to be known for something other than their small town-ness, their insularity and the challenges of their mining economy. After seeing the documentary, I really wanted go see this memorial. more information routing and remote access windows 7 Six Million Paper Clips: The Making of a Children’s Holocaust Memorialis an inspiring story of how a group of students created a project that resulted in international awareness about the Holocaust. In , the children of Whitwell Middle School in Whitwell, Tennessee began a moving journey. Mar 17,  · They are from the Whitwell middle school and as a part of a course on the Nazi holocaust during World War II, an idea got started to construct a memorial to the 6 million Jewish victims of the holocaust: to collect 6 million paper clips and use them for the memorial. The idea has gained international attention. Operation Paperclip. The term "Overcast" was the name first given by the German scientists' family members for the housing camp where they were held in Bavaria. In late summer , the JCS established the JIOA, a subcommittee of the Joint Intelligence Community, to directly oversee Operation Overcast and later Operation Paperclip.

Twenty years ago in the town of Whitwell, Tennessee, a thought-revolution was underway. If the town didn't know it at the time, it's because they could not have imagined what one simple question — and, more importantly, what one middle school principal's brilliant refusal to render a simple answer — would unleash. But the tiny mining town of approximately 2, people, The creation of the Children's Holocaust Memorial at Whitwell Middle School is a moving story of passion, creative vision, faith and teamwork.

It has brought hundreds of thousands of tourists to a town that, prior to the museum's creation, few had heard of. The memorial and its genesis would become the subject of a documentary film, "Paper Clips," which would be shown around the world. And it would be the impetus for an international service-learning curriculum, "One Clip at a Time," that would eventually boast educators trained in 29 states plus Canada and Israel.

We at Chatter decided to look back to the inception of the memorial two decades after the fact, and to ask a few of those involved about the impact of the project on them, and on the town of Whitwell.

And many of the kids who did leave town after high school had difficulty adjusting, and returned. So Hooper hatched an idea.

She asked associate principal David Smith and language arts teacher Sandra Roberts to start an after-school program. They would look at the Holocaust and at other humanitarian atrocities and genocides worldwide.

They would talk about prejudice, hatred, stereotyping, tolerance and diversity at home and abroad; about other cultures and ways of thinking; and about what could be gained, personally and globally, from entertaining a broader, more inclusive worldview. Attendance in the program would be completely voluntary. In-school fighting diminished. Children who had shunned one another began sitting together in the cafeteria. Then a student posed a now-historic question that would set the program, the school and the town on a much larger course: "What does 6 million look like?

Kids and teachers got together and crafted letters to relatives and friends, world leaders and celebrities, telling about their study program and their goal to collect 6 million paper clips. As clips poured in from all over the world they stopped counting at 30 million , so did letters of support and encouragement.

They received 30, letters, from all seven continents and almost every state, penned by Holocaust survivors and their families, famous people, political figures, students and the general public.

Every letter was read and catalogued and placed in large binders. In , the school received a donation of an authentic German rail car that the Third Reich had used during World War II to transport prisoners to camps. It was installed for free in front of Whitwell Middle, and 11 million clips — representing the 6 million Jews and 5 million gypsies, homosexuals and other victims of the Holocaust — were poured into it.

They are on display behind a clear wall on the train; a visual, profoundly moving representation of the magnitude of lives lost. Chattanooga resident Alison Lebovitz is president and founder of One Clip at a Time, the nonprofit teaching service curriculum structured around the documentary film "Paper Clips. Realizing that the film was structured around five more or less natural "clips" no pun intended gave her committee an idea. They named the curriculum, fittingly, "One Clip at a Time.

Specifically, we give students the tools to ask the right questions. What can students do to make an impact, to help senior neighbors, to eliminate pollution, to aid student in need?

What do those things look like on a daily basis? How can they not only understand, but also address those needs and make a real difference? That's all in the One Clip at a Time teaching kit, and our goal is to reach as many people as possible with it. Resident Taylor McDaniel remembers helping to count paper clips in her social studies class.

She was in the fifth grade when the rail car was dedicated. I couldn't wait until I was old enough to join the Holocaust education group and learn more," she says. That chance would come when she was in the eighth grade. Not content to just be in the group, McDaniel also signed up to give tours of the rail cars to visitors. Now an eighth-grade U. McDaniel echoes Hooper's reasoning for starting the after-school education group at the middle school.

It's important for them to understand that there is a world outside of Whitwell," McDaniel says. We now have students leaving for college with a better understanding of other peoples, and they are better prepared for the world — it shows as students succeed in their fields.

The impact has been immeasurable. McDaniel says she is always amazed at the number of people who know of the Children's Holocaust Memorial and "Paper Clips" documentary when she travels.

A Holocaust survivor told the audience that the reason he started telling his story was because he watched ['Paper Clips']," she recounts. That is powerful. Ultimately, Higdon's other son, Gregory, as well as one nephew and four nieces would also become involved with the project. The stories left a mark on my heart that I will never forget. There was a retired widow who sent a dollar and some change to help in whatever way she could. There was a Holocaust survivor who told of the horrors of a concentration camp.

And although there were negative letters as well, from Nazi sympathizers, Holocaust deniers and white supremacists, they amounted to only one binder-full.

Higdon and her boys would become part of the documentary built around the project, and she calls it "one of the greatest experiences of our lives. Similarly, Higdon says the Children's Holocaust Memorial has brought diverse groups of people together, to a community "where residents don't even leave the county if they don't have to. I dare say both sides have impacted the other in a mostly positive way. Still, the project's endurance surprises her.

Says Lebovitz, "We will never know the full impact of the project because it's still rippling out. Self-guided tours are available. The store can be reached at Student-led tours are offered on Fridays beginning at a. Central when school is in session. To book, visit whitwellmiddleschool. Amy Horne Advertising Operations Manager o: c: ahorne timesfreepress. The donated rail car, paid for by donations from German citizens, sits in a courtyard that houses sculptural butterflies and a monument honoring the estimated 1.

She was well aware of the fact that the kids at her school had little exposure to the world outside of Whitwell — many of its residents had never left the county — and of the resulting social, economic and intellectual ramifications, both for the town and the kids' lives.

That first year, 40 students enrolled. This commemorative stamp is dedicated to Vaaler, but shows the Gem paper clip, already in existence when he received his patent for a different design in Rather than simply offering up a mathematical formula regarding the number of Jews killed, or scrawling a number on the board with an assembly of zeros after it, Hooper decided a visual — perhaps a collection of some sort — might make the enormity of the figure tangible.

After some discussion, she and the teachers settled on what had been the Norwegian symbol of resistance during World War II: the humble paper clip.

Binders full of letters from supporters, Holocaust survivors, world leaders, celebrities, and students worldwide line the walls of the Memorial library. Those binders reside, along with over 50, donated mementos inspired by or recovered from the Holocaust and other genocides, on the shelves of a dedicated library space at Whitwell Middle School. The space is now known as the Children's Holocaust Memorial. Two decades after tackling the topic, Whitwell is still a town of fewer than 2, people.

It's still overwhelmingly white Protestant and there are still no Jews, no Muslims and no Catholics. The town itself has not changed. But what has changed, says Lebovitz, is how the town is viewed. The Children's Holocaust Memorial brought the world to the small town's doorstep and has allowed people there to gather around a common cause; to be known for something other than their small town-ness, their insularity and the challenges of their mining economy.

When Whitwell resident Mary Jane Higdon's oldest son Jonathan was in the seventh grade, she participated in Holocaust classes with him. Little did she know that the project would become a major part of their lives for almost 10 years. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the majority of children arriving at camps like Auschwitz were sent directly to the gas chambers upon arrival. Some, however, were chosen for dangerous science experiments or forced manual labor.

Pictured here, child survivors of Auschwitz don adult-size prisoner jackets. In terms of the project's personal effect, Higdon says, "I've been places I would have never gone, and made lifelong friendships with people I never would have met. As a mother it has been a blessing to watch the kids grow in understanding and tolerance of other ways of life without compromising their own beliefs.

If you go Self-guided tours are available. Next Article Retreats to revitalize your mind and body for the new year Previous Article Beyond brunch: A cultural guide to pancakes. Chatter Sections Main. People Scene. Subscribe to Chatter. Advertise Amy Horne Advertising Operations Manager o: c: ahorne timesfreepress.

Holocaust and the themes and motivations behind Six. Million Paper Clips. The guide offers a history of the Whitwell Holocaust project, a description of the. Holocaust Memorial Programming at Florida SouthWestern State College. The Paper Clips Project burgeoned, garnering international attention. In The documentary film, "Paper Clips," released in , tells the inspirational story. It is a most unlikely place to build a Holocaust memorial, much less one that where the red-brick Rhea County Courthouse made history during the . "The Paper Clip Project," which has not been translated into English, was. Packed into this Nazi box car are 11 million paper clips, each representing a World War II casualty. A sincere project by Tennessee school children. The Paper Clips Project, by middle school students from the small southeastern Tennessee town of Whitwell, created a monument for the Holocaust victims of Nazi Germany. It started in as a simple 8th-grade project to study other cultures, and.

this Paper clips project holocaust history

The Paper Clips Project, by middle school students from the small southeastern Tennessee town of Whitwell, created a monument for the Holocaust victims of. When the students, mostly white and Christian, struggled to grasp the concept and enormity of the six million Jews who died during the Holocaust, they decided to. The documentary film, "Paper Clips," released in , tells the inspirational story​. To learn more about the Paper Clips Project and the award-winning. But the story of what happened in that small rural town has inspired millions around the world to share their stories of courage, survival and hope. “Be grateful for. The creation of the Children's Holocaust Memorial at Whitwell Middle School is a moving story of passion, creative vision, faith and teamwork. of a documentary film, "Paper Clips," which would be shown around the world. This is a story about two German journalists, one Internet-surfing Holocaust survivor, and the millions of paper clips middle school students in. As a part of their study of the Holocaust, the children of the Whitwell, TN Middle School try to collect 6 million paper clips representing the 6 million Jews Everyone should see this video, know this story, puff up a little bit about the This basic documentary is shot simply and full of talking heads, and loaded with an often. As a part of their study of the Holocaust, the children of the Whitwell, TN Middle School 30 million paperclips as part Tom Bosley in the documentary PAPERCLIPS Paper Clips () A marvelous real life story about real small town people. Using the example of the "Paper Clip Project" (the Children's caust Memorialization" Jewish Social Studies: History, Culture, Society n.s. 14, no. 1. (​Fall. ).Feb 02,  · The Paper Clip Project, or, “The Children’s Holocaust Memorial,” began with the idea of creating a memorial that could give tangibility to the deaths of millions of Jews; if the students could create an artistic memorial that mirrored the enormity of these deaths, they could give others the potential to reflect on the scale of such an atrocity. Jun 02,  · In a covert affair originally dubbed Operation Overcast but later renamed Operation Paperclip, roughly 1, of these German scientists (along with their families) were brought to Author: Laura Schumm. A lesson about the HOLOCAUST turned into a four year project for eighth graders in Whitwell TN that eventually encompassed people from around the world - one paper clip at a time. I highly recommend watching this documentary no matter who you are or what you believe. It may change your life!!!! As simple as that, the students began collecting paper clips from their homes. Pretty soon they were telling relatives and friends about the Paper Clip Holocaust Project and before long they had paper clips. They wrote letters to film stars, politicians, sports heroes and industry leaders asking for .

paper clips project holocaust history